PIANO GLOVES

11/13/10

posted Jan 13, 2010, 8:05 AM by Unknown user

So we soldered all the dimes to phone wire that we had, so now we are soldering the ends of the phone wire so it will be able to connect to the analog pins easier... we then will fix the coding for the right hand and test it so as to see that we still have working piano gloves! Since we don't have phone wire for the left hand, we have to jut stick with the right hand for now until Chelsea goes to the dollar store to get phone wire!

The Construction continues...

posted Jan 12, 2010, 8:05 AM by Unknown user

Basically, we are still soldering...we have two down and seven more dimes to go... tomorrow unfortunately, we will have to glue down the dimes because we don't have anymore glue stick for the glue gun! As Danielle finishes the soldering, Chelsea is going to finish the coding...

Soldering and OCD!!!!

posted Jan 11, 2010, 8:39 AM by Unknown user

Today we have decided since we have the dimes all ready to be soldered that Danielle should solder!! so she did! She also executed a perfect soldering job on her first dime!!! Congrats, Danielle!!! Then we had a thought...Could this be illegal??? Is drilling holes into pennies and dimes illegal??? Unfortunately the glue gun is out of glue stick and since Mr. Dickie is not here, we couldn't ask... This can be done tomorrow! Chelsea with her OCD tried to cut off the excess pieces of dime on the side of the drilled hole. she was able to fix one, but the razor blade dulled down so was unable to fix the other! Danielle says, "thats what you get for using a razor blade!"...Now as for the coding, Chelsea is going to attempt to fix it so that the octaves and flats are included!!! Keyword: attempt!!!

Getting back to work!

posted Jan 7, 2010, 8:32 AM by Unknown user

Right now, we are trying to finish our previous idea of adding flats instead of  sharps and adding the ability to change the octave from the base octave to a higher or a lower octave...as previously stated....Today, Chelsea brought the dimes, so now we can work on construction. After we finish the construction, we then need to finish the coding, but of course, there are problems...including the fact that the one of the thumbs is not working to change the octave...Oh wait, now it works!!! *HIGH FIVE* We also decided to play with the alligator clamps and the extra change that Chelsea had and Danielle attached the alligator clamps to the positive wires and the extra change... Danielle played Zelda with the different octaves.

WE'RE BAAAAAACK!!!!

posted Jan 5, 2010, 8:41 AM by Unknown user

Okay, so today has been a day of brainstorming. We have figured out how to get sharps AND octaves.

So basically, for the notes that have a sharp that isn't just another note, we put another penny below the main penny on the finger. That way you can easily transition to sharps from naturals.

For octaves, we're just going to add a penny on the inside of each thumb and the outside of the pointer finger so to make an octave you just have to move the thumb a little bit on the LEFT hand to go to a lower octave and on the RIGHT hand for a higher octave.

Okay, so after our brilliant ideas took shape, Mr. Dickie came and burst our bubble. Our ingenious plan had a flaw: 20 BUTTONS?!?!?!?! There are only 19 pins on an arduino board IF you  make the analog pins digital. So we were sad. But then we came up with an idea. If we make FLATS instead of SHARPS, then we achieve our 19 pin goal.

For Ryan...

posted Dec 17, 2009, 8:38 AM by Unknown user

Okay, so since we're apparently the "Music Girls" and a certain SOMEONE keeps coming back to us with questions, we decided to make a post just for making music with Arduino. It's a basic post, we're not going to go into detail how you use Tone Library. We're assuming you have installed it and basically know how it works. Remember, CASE IS IMPORTANT.

Put this where you put all your other variables:
#include <Tone.h>                
  Tone noiseMaker;

Put this in void setup:
noiseMaker.begin(2)   <---- 2 is the pin that your speaker is plugged into. (The other is plugged into ground)

Now, to PLAY the note:
noiseMaker.play(NOTE_C2)

OR

noiseMaker.play(65.41) <---- this is the same note. It's just the frequency of the note. This is a better way to put it if you are going to change it in the sketch. (Like we did with                   
                                            the aluminum foil version of the piano gloves [see 12/17/09]) Frequency Chart: http://www.phy.mtu.edu/~suits/notefreqs.html

So that's basically it. Come see us if you have anymore questions.



12/17/09

posted Dec 17, 2009, 8:28 AM by Unknown user

Woops! We haven't made any posts lately.


Okay so here's what you missed..

We finished soldering the wires to the pennies and hot glued them to the tips of the fingers so when you pressed the thumb and a finger to each other, it played a note.

Then we tried switching it up so that when you connect a piece of aluminum foil to positive power, you can press the fingers to the foil to play a note. Those notes would be in the second octave. But to change things up a little bit, we made it so when you put ONE thumb down, it goes the the third octave. Then when you put BOTH thumbs down, it goes to the fourth octave. very exciting.

Here's the coding for this version:

   /*
  Piano Gloves
  by Danielle Norman(coding) and Chelsea Hancock(wiring)
    */
   
  int inputPin4 = 4;               // sets the Input Pins for the push buttons 
  int inputPin5 = 5;               // for the first hand
  int inputPin6 = 6;
  int inputPin7 = 7;
  
  int b = 0;
  int x = 0;
  int y = 0;
  
  int inputPin8 = 8;                // second hand input pins
  int inputPin9 = 9;
  int inputPin10 = 10;
  int inputPin11 = 11;
  
  int inputPin12 = 12;
  int inputPin13 = 13;             // Thumbs
  
  #include <Tone.h>                // starts the tone library
  Tone noiseMaker;
   
   
   
   
   void setup() {
                                       // start the music:
     noiseMaker.begin(2);
    

    
     pinMode (inputPin4, INPUT);      // sets all the input pins as INPUT
     pinMode (inputPin5, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin6, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin7, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin8, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin9, INPUT); 
     pinMode (inputPin10, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin11, INPUT);
          
   }
  
     

  
  
  
  void loop() {
   
    
    
    x = digitalRead(inputPin12);
    y = digitalRead(inputPin13);
    b = x + y + 1;
       
    
   
    
    
    
  
   while (digitalRead(inputPin4) == HIGH)
     {
       noiseMaker.play(65.41 * b);
     }
     
     while (digitalRead(inputPin5) == HIGH)
       {
       noiseMaker.play(73.42 * b);
       }
       
       while (digitalRead(inputPin6) == HIGH)
         {
         noiseMaker.play(82.41 * b);
         }
         
         while (digitalRead(inputPin7) == HIGH)
           {
           noiseMaker.play(87.31 * b);
           } 
           
           while (digitalRead(inputPin8) == HIGH)
             {
             noiseMaker.play(98.00 * b);
             }
             
             while (digitalRead(inputPin9) == HIGH)
               {
               noiseMaker.play(110.00 * b);
               }
               
               while (digitalRead(inputPin10) == HIGH)
                 {
                 noiseMaker.play(123.47 * b);
                 }
                 
                 while (digitalRead(inputPin11) == HIGH)
                   {
                   noiseMaker.play(130.81 * b);
                   }
                
               noiseMaker.stop();
          
         
  }
   

However, the whole point of the piano gloves in the first place was to have a PORTABLE Piano that you could play in your hands. We don't want to have to make you carry around a piece of aluminum foil around with you all the time. So now it's back to square one. We're thinking a push button attached to each glove. When they're both NOT triggered, its the third (middle) octave. When the left is triggered, it plays the lower octave. The right, the higher octave. We might also make it so when BOTh are pushed, it plays sharps. But that would be kind of awkward to push both every single time you want to play a sharp (Fur Elise would SUCK.) So we need to rethink it.

Here's the basic thumb-to-finger code:

   /*
  Piano Gloves
  by Danielle Norman(coding) and Chelsea Hancock(wiring)
    */
   
  int inputPin4 = 4;               // sets the Input Pins for the push buttons 
  int inputPin5 = 5;               // for the first hand
  int inputPin6 = 6;
  int inputPin7 = 7;
  
  int inputPin8 = 8;                // second hand input pins
  int inputPin9 = 9;
  int inputPin10 = 10;
  int inputPin11 = 11;
  
  int inputPin12 = 12;
  int inputPin13 = 13;             // Thumbs
  
  #include <Tone.h>                // starts the tone library
  Tone noiseMaker;
   
   
   
   
   void setup() {
                                       // start the music:
     noiseMaker.begin(2);
    

    
     pinMode (inputPin4, INPUT);      // sets all the input pins as INPUT
     pinMode (inputPin5, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin6, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin7, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin8, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin9, INPUT); 
     pinMode (inputPin10, INPUT);
     pinMode (inputPin11, INPUT);
          
   }
  
     

  
  
  
  void loop() {
  
   while (digitalRead(inputPin4) == HIGH)
     {
       noiseMaker.play(65.41);
     }
     
     while (digitalRead(inputPin5) == HIGH)
       {
       noiseMaker.play(73.42);
       }
       
       while (digitalRead(inputPin6) == HIGH)
         {
         noiseMaker.play(82.41);
         }
         
         while (digitalRead(inputPin7) == HIGH)
           {
           noiseMaker.play(87.31);
           } 
           
           while (digitalRead(inputPin8) == HIGH)
             {
             noiseMaker.play(98.00);
             }
             
             while (digitalRead(inputPin9) == HIGH)
               {
               noiseMaker.play(110.00);
               }
               
               while (digitalRead(inputPin10) == HIGH)
                 {
                 noiseMaker.play(123.47);
                 }
                 
                 while (digitalRead(inputPin11) == HIGH)
                   {
                   noiseMaker.play(130.81);
                   }
                
               noiseMaker.stop();
          
         
  }
   

12/9/09

posted Dec 9, 2009, 8:48 AM by Unknown user

Chelsea: did not screw up!!!! she also finished untangling the wiring on the bread board due to the cramped spacing in the shelf...

Danielle: soldered. ALOT.


12/18/09

posted Dec 9, 2009, 8:48 AM by Unknown user

Danielle and Chelsea: Tried to figure out why two of the buttons were playing the same note. Then we found out they were touching eachother. NO PDA!!!! 

12/8/09

posted Dec 8, 2009, 8:29 AM by Unknown user   [ updated Dec 8, 2009, 8:53 AM ]

Mooooooore soldering. Except now we have a nifty Soldering Gun. Be Jealous. :D


We're also thinking about changing the circuit/program to incorporate analog so we can play sharps, flats, different octaves, more than one note at a time, etc. etc. Right now it used digital input.  

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